Does my Disaster Recovery plan have to include Business Continuity?

First, let’s look at a comprehensive definition of Business Continuity:

Ensuring that the critical operations of a company can continue without stoppage; the capacity to restore systems to a pre-defined level of operation; and the ability maintain acceptable customer service, including delivery of products or services, irrespective of adverse events and following any disruption.

As we can see, Business Continuity includes recovering from any business interruption, which could be as small as a few minutes to as large as recovering from a disaster. Therefore, Disaster Recovery is actually only one part of a larger Business Continuity Plan.

The reason that Disaster Recovery is more familiar is because this type of recovery is the most extensive type of recovery and it gets more press. Truth is, disruptions to business happen all the time but usually companies can provide work arounds quickly enough that those disruptions don’t significantly impact customer service. The key question is, are you using the most efficient method in your recovery?

The goal is to create plans that address all types of potential disruptions, agree on which systems and processes will be addressed first, and have contingencies for a wide range of scenarios. For example, what if no one is available to execute the plan? Could a disaster far away impact your business? What about a hazardous incident on the nearest highway, at your nearest electrical station, or a fire in the offices next door?

To be able to build out their plans and create contingent manual processes if necessary, all departments will need to agree upon the order in which systems will be recovered and which processes take precedence. And IT will need to create their plan to incorporate these requirements alongside their own. When you have developed well thought through and tested plans, you will be able to withstand any size outage with the smallest affect possible to your bottom line.